Updated CFP with Guests, SFRA 2010 Far Stars and Tin Stars: Science Fiction on the Frontier

Craig Jacobsen sent out the updated SFRA 2010 Conference call for proposals along with the special guest list. Read on for the details, and I’ll see you in Arizona!

Call for Proposals: SFRA 2010: “Far Stars and Tin Stars: Science Fiction and the Frontier”

The 2010 Science Fiction Research Association (www.sfra.org) conference theme, “Far Stars and Tin Stars: Science Fiction and the Frontier,” reflects the conference’s venue in the high desert of Carefree, Arizona, north of Phoenix. The frontier, the borderland between what is known and what is unknown, the settled and the wild, the mapped and the unexplored, is as central to science fiction as it is to the mythology of the American West.

International Guest Scholar Pawel Frelik: “Gained in Translation: Dispersed Narratives in Contemporary Culture”

Guest Scholar Margaret Weitekamp: “Ray Guns, Play Sets, and Board Games: What Space Toys Say About the Frontier”

Guest Scholar/Author Joan Slonczewski: “Tree Networks and Transspecies Sex: Biology in Avatar”

Submissions are invited for individual papers (15-20 minutes), full paper panels (3 papers), roundtables (80 minute sessions), and other presentations that explore the study and teaching of science fiction in any medium. Preference will be given to proposals that engage the conference theme.

Paper and other session proposals should be 200-300 words. Paper panel proposals should include the proposals of all three papers and a brief statement of their unifying principle. Include all text of the proposal in the body of the email (not as an attachment). Please be sure to include full contact information for all panel members and to make all AV requests within each proposal.

In addition to traditional paper panels, the conference will include several “Year in Review” sessions in which a small panel will present observations about the most significant texts in a given area before inviting audience discussion. Individual panels will cover SF Scholarship, SF in Print, SF Film, SF Television, SF Games. Anyone interested in serving on one of these panels should contact the Conference Coordinator.

For the first time, SFRA 2010 will offer three pre-conference “Short Courses” the morning of the conference’s first day. One will examine teaching science fiction in higher education, one will provide interested scholars a primer on studying digital science fiction, and the third will offer students (and anyone else interested) an orientation to science fiction scholarship.

The conference is open to other non-traditional programming suggestions that take advantage of an in-person gathering of science fiction scholars.

E-mail submissions as attached files by April 30, 2010 to Conference Coordinator Craig Jacobsen: jacobsen at mesacc dot edu

Ongoing submission acceptances will be issued to better allow presenters to plan.

The conference will run June 24-27, 2010. Visit the conference website at www.sfra2010.ning.com. Rather than a static site, this year’s conference web presence is a social network designed to allow attendees (and those considering) to join, network before during and after the conference, and collaborate in the construction of the conference. Sign up even if you are not sure whether you’ll attend.

Please distribute this call freely to anyone who might be interested.

I am a professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY whose teaching includes composition and technical communication, and research focuses on 20th/21st-century American culture, science fiction, neuroscience, and digital technology.

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Who is Dynamic Subspace?

Dr. Jason W. Ellis shares his interdisciplinary research and pedagogy on DynamicSubspace.net. Its focus includes the exploration of science, technology, and cultural issues through science fiction and neuroscientific approaches. It includes vintage computing, LEGO, and other wonderful things, too.

He is an Assistant Professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City Tech) where he teaches college writing, technical communication, and science fiction.

He holds a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University, M.A. in Science Fiction Studies from the University of Liverpool, and B.S. in Science, Technology, and Culture from Georgia Tech.

He welcomes questions, comments, and inquiries for collaboration via email at jellis at citytech dot cuny dot edu or Twitter @dynamicsubspace.

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