SFRA Award Winners for 2010, Congratulations to All

Science Fiction Research Association President Lisa Yaszek announced the 2010 SFRA Award winners in the following categories. Congratulations to everyone. I can say from my experience on the Mary Kay Bray Award committee for the second year that there were a lot of fantastic reviews and essays considered. From reading everything in this past year’s SFRA Review to side reading in Extrapolation, Foundation, and the New York Review of Science Fiction, to name only a few, I can see the field of science fiction scholarship continuing its asymptotic assent into wider significance within and without the academy. Is there a singularity future for science fiction scholarship? If there is, what will science fiction scholarship look like ‘on the other side’? I can’t wait to find out. In the meantime, here are your 2010 SFRA Award Winners:

Pilgrim Award (for lifetime contributions to sf & f studies)
Eric Rabkin

Pioneer Award (for the most outstanding sf studies essay of the year)
Allison de Fren, “The Anatomical Gaze in Tomorrow’s Eve,” published in Science Fiction Studies No. 108, Vol. 36 (2), July 2009: 235-265)

Clareson Award (for distinguished service)
David Mead

Mary Kay Bray Award (for the best essay, interview, or extended review in the past year’s SFRA Review)
Ritch Calvin, “Mundane SF 101”

Student Paper Award (for the best paper presented at the previous year’s SFRA conference)
Andrew Ferguson, “Such Delight in Bloody Slaughter: R. A. Lafferty and the Dismemberment of the Body Grotesque”

I am a professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY whose teaching includes composition and technical communication, and research focuses on 20th/21st-century American culture, science fiction, neuroscience, and digital technology.

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Who is Dynamic Subspace?

Dr. Jason W. Ellis shares his interdisciplinary research and pedagogy on DynamicSubspace.net. Its focus includes the exploration of science, technology, and cultural issues through science fiction and neuroscientific approaches. It includes vintage computing, LEGO, and other wonderful things, too.

He is an Assistant Professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City Tech) where he teaches college writing, technical communication, and science fiction.

He holds a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University, M.A. in Science Fiction Studies from the University of Liverpool, and B.S. in Science, Technology, and Culture from Georgia Tech.

He welcomes questions, comments, and inquiries for collaboration via email at jellis at citytech dot cuny dot edu or Twitter @dynamicsubspace.

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