Pakistaniaat Launches Its Own Open Journal System (OJS) Hosting Service

OAlogoMasood Raja, my friend and former professor, told me the exciting news today that Pakistaniaat has started its own Open Journal System (OJS) hosting service. This means that if you want to found your own open access journal, you can purchase OJS hosting from Pakistaniaat.  Masood founded Pakistaniaat on open access principles, so I believe that this new endeavor takes what began with his journal to the next level by providing the hosting and software necessary for an OJS-based journal to thrive. Find all of the details here.

Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies Vol 3 No 1 (2011) Now Available

I served as the first layout editor of Pakistaniaat, but I had to give up my responsibilities after working with the journal for two years so that I could devote my attention to my dissertation. Nevertheless, I am always happy to announce when a new issue is available for free online. Editor Masood Raja has just completed his first layout job with the first issue of 2011–Vol. 3, No. 1. You can find it here in PDF format, or you can purchase a nicely bound print version here.

Pakistaniaat Special Issue: The 1971 Indo-Pakistan War Now Published

The latest issue of the open access journal Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies, Vol. 2 Issue 3 is now available here!

This is a special issue on The 1971 Indo-Pakistan War and it is edited by Dr. Cara Cilano, University of North Carolina, Wilmington. This issue includes articles by Philip Oldenburg, Roger Vogler, Luke A. Nichter and Richard A. Moss, and Mavra Farooq. There are reviews of Shailah Abdullah’s Saffron Dreams, Ali Seth’s The Wish Maker, Afzal Ahmed Syed’s Rococo and Other Worlds, and Modern Poetry of Pakistan. The issue also includes notes on human and economic growth by Asad Zaman and a review of an exhibit of Pakistan art in France by David Waterman. You will find new poetry by Rizwan Akhtar and Shadab Zeest Hashmi, too. View the whole table of contents here.

This is also the last issue of Pakistaniaat in which I will serve as layout editor. It has been a very rewarding experience helping Masood Raja with Pakistaniaat. I clearly remember him approaching me one afternoon in my office at school about a new journal that he was launching. He needed someone to layout the issues for online access and printing, and he thought I would be the right person for the job. Masood wrote some very kind things about my work and our laying out the journal here. The first issue was a harrowing adventure for me–creating a layout template, figuring out the changes in InDesign from the outdated Pagemaker I learned over 10 years ago in high school, and troubleshooting un-embedded fonts at the 11th hour inside Angel Falls Coffee Shop in Akron. I would like to thank Masood for giving me an opportunity to work such an important project from its beginning. I also give thanks to the many contributors to the journal and its editors. Best of luck to the journal’s continued success and good work!

[About the picture above: Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and Indira Gandhi meeting for the Simla talks.]

Pakistaniaat Is Now Available Through the Amazon Kindle Store

Masood Raja first inaugurated the open access journal Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies almost two years ago. I signed on as the layout editor, and we produced a free downloadable PDF of each article and issue. We also made the journal available here via Lulu’s print-on-demand service for those people and institutions who would prefer a printed version of the journal. Now, Raja has taken the next step for furthering the digital distribution of the critical and creative work in Pakistaniaat with a new Amazon Kindle version of each journal’s issue. You can read about the details and find a link to the Kindle store on the Pakistaniaat Forum site here.

Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies Summer 2010 Issue Now Released!

I finished the layout for the Summer 2010 issue of Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies tonight. This is our fourth issue, and it is chock-full of articles, reviews, interviews, and poetry. It is an open access journal, so check it out here.

The editor is trying out something new with this issue. All of the individual articles are still freely available and will remain so, because it is an open access journal. Since the beginning, you could also purchase a print version here to help fund the journal’s costs, which include site maintenance, software, and honoraria. Now, if you would like to download a PDF of the full issue to read and print on your own, you may do so for a small donation. This should go live tomorrow on the official site here.

The Summer 2010 issue includes:

Cover art: Amar RazaAl-Kauthar, (Watercolor 3’x4′), 108th sura of the Qur’an.

Articles

Distinctive Cultural and Geographical Legacy of Bahawalpur Samia Khalid and Aftab Hussain Gilani …………………………………………………………1

Memory and Cultural Identity: Negotiating Modernity in Nadeem Aslam’s Maps for Lost Lovers David Waterman ……………………………………………………………………………………….18

Political Manipulation in Human Rights Violations: A Case of Honor Killings in Balochistan, Pakistan Noor Akbar Khalil and Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh …………………………………………36

Reviews

Fawzia Afzal-Khan’s Lahore With Love Swaralipi Nandi ………………………………………………………………………………………..44

Ali Eteraz’s Children of Dust David Waterman ……………………………………………………………………………………….48

Musharraf Ali Farooqi’s Translation of The Adventures of Amir Hamza Colleen Thorndike……………………………………………………………………………………..51

Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh’s Side Effects: Portrait of a Young Artist in Lahore Tatiana Zelenetskaya Young ……………………………………………………………………….54

Notes and Commentaries

From Malakand with Love! Shaikh Muhammad Ali ………………………………………………………………………………57

Labor Unionization in Pakistan – History & Trends Riffat Bawa and Waqar Hashmi…………………………………………………………………..78

Poetry and Prose

Diary of a Wartime Chef Shadab Zeest Hashmi…………………………………………………………………………………83

Ghazal Shadab Zeest Hashmi…………………………………………………………………………………84

Kitchen Cabinet Rizwan Akhtar ………………………………………………………………………………………….85

Punjabi Mehnaz Turner ………………………………………………………………………………………….87

Interviews

An Interview with Professor Pervez Hoodbhoy Mustafa Qadri …………………………………………………………………………………………..88

Notable Pakistan-Related Texts

List of Recent Pakistan-Related Texts David Waterman ……………………………………………………………………………………….94

Book Announcement: Constructing Pakistan: Foundational Texts and the Rise of Muslim National Identity, 1857-1947

Masood Ashraf Raja, my friend and co-editor of The Postnational Fantasy (tentative title) with me and Swaralipi Nandi, has just had his book Constructing Pakistan: Foundational Texts and the Rise of Muslim National Identity, 1857-1947 published by Oxford University Press. The full details from here are included below. Also, check out Raja’s writings on his new blog, Postcolonialities: Postcolonial Theory and Critical Pedagogy, and don’t forget to read his journal (that I copyedit) Pakistaniaat.

Book Description

Constructing Pakistan addresses the previously neglected aspect of postcolonial and historical engagement with the creation and construction of Indian Muslim national identity before the partition of India in 1947. Masood Ashraf Raja’s main assertion, challenging the conventional and postcolonial appraisals of the Indian national history, is that the Indian Muslim particular identity and Muslim exceptionalism preceded the rise of Congress or Gandhian nationalism. Using major theories of nationalism-including works of Benedict Anderson, Anthony D. Smith, John Breuilly, Partha Chatterjee and others-and analysis of literary, political, and religious texts produced by Indian Muslims, Constructing Pakistan traces the varied Muslim responses to the post 1857 British ascendancy. This study provides a multilayered discussion of Indian Muslim nationalism from the rise of post 1857 Muslim exceptionalism to the beginnings of a more focused struggle for a nation-sate in the 1940s.

In this dual act of retrieval and intervention, a varied mixture of literary, political, and religious texts are employed to suggest that if the Muslim textual production of this time period is read within the realm of politics and not just within the arena of culture, then the rise of Indian Muslim nationalism can be clearly traced within these texts and through their affective value for the Indian Muslims.

Raja states that no such work exits either in the postcolonial field or in the field of area studies that combines close readings of the texts, their reception, and the politics of identity formation specifically related to the rise of Indian Muslim nationalism. The author’s main argument hinges on two important assumptions: 1) After the rebellion it becomes extremely important for the Muslim elite to force the dominant British regime into a hegemonic view of the Muslims, and 2) this forces the Muslim elite to develop a language of politics that must always invoke the people in order to enter the British system of privileges and dispensations. Consequently, the rise of early Muslim exceptionalism and its eventual specific nationalistic unfolding, of which Pakistan was one outcome, can then be read as political acts that long preceded the Indian national party politics. The reason most Indian and European historians cannot trace a pronounced Muslim sense of separate identity before the 1940s is because they trace this identity either in the form of resistance or in the shape of party politics. The early loyalism of the Muslim elite, in such strategy, remains unexplained, as it does not fit the resistance model. Constructing Pakistan attempts to re-read this loyalism as a sophisticated form of resistance that, in the end, makes the Muslim question central to the British politics of post-rebellion era.

Publication Details

  • Hardcover: 182 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press,  2010
  • ISBN-10: 0195478118
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195478112

To Order:

In Pakistan: Oxford Website.

Amazon. com Link