Assessing Multimodality: Navigating the Digital Turn Tweet Round Up on Storify and a Picture of Me and My Pedagogy Poster

My Pedagogy Poster on "Writing the Brain" at Assessing Multimodality Symposium.
My Pedagogy Poster on “Writing the Brain” at Assessing Multimodality Symposium.

Today, the Georgia Tech Writing and Communication Program and Bedford St. Martins hosted a symposium on Assessing Multimodality: Navigating the Digital Turn. I co-presented a workshop with Mirja Lobnik on Multimodality and Perception and I presented a poster during one of the day’s sessions. Many of us were tweeting our experiences at the symposium today, too. Click through the Storify embed below to virtually experience the symposium 140 characters at a time.

[View the story “Assessing Multimodality: Navigating the Digital Turn Symposium” on Storify]

Mirja Lobnik’s and My Workshop at the Assessing Multimodality: Navigating the Digital Turn Symposium: Multimodality and Perception: A Multi-Sensory Approach to Teaching Rhetorical Skills

photo
Perception and cognition.

This morning, Mirja Lobnik and I will be co-hosting a workshop on “Multimodality and Perception: A Multi-Sensory Approach to Teaching Rhetorical Skills” at the Assessing Multimodality: Navigating the Digital Turn Symposium co-hosted by Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program and Bedford St. Martin’s. Our workshop is about multisensory perception, multimodal composition, and cognition:

Associated with the use of various media to create cohesive rhetorical artifacts and the neurology of the ways humans process information through different sensory channels, multimodality has gained considerable ground in the composition classroom. Insofar as multimodal pedagogies emphasize the role of students as active, resourceful, and creative meaning-makers, it tends to enhance student engagement and, by extension, the teaching of composition and rhetorical skills. Focusing on sensory details of embodied, lived experience, this workshop centers on teaching that engages students both in mind and body. This approach not only promotes the students’ creation of multimodal artifacts but also encourages students to explore and critically reflect on personal experiences. Specifically, Lobnik focuses on aural composing modalities, including speech, music, and sound, and assignments that highlight sound as a rhetorical and creative resource: a transcription, audio essay, and a video. Ellis discusses cognition, metacognition, and curation and an assignment that integrates Twitter, Storify, ComicLife, and the written essay.

If you get to attend our workshop or the symposium’s other great sessions, please tweet using the hashtag: #AMsymposium.

Science Fiction Symposium at Georgia Tech, November 17, 2011, Open to Public

Georgia Tech’s School of Literature, Communication, and Culture is an important place for the study of science fiction. It began with Bud Foote’s science fiction classes and the donation of his extensive science fiction and fantasy collection, and then it was further developed by Lisa Yaszek through her research, teaching, and organizing events. LCC also includes Kathleen Ann Goonan, the award winning science fiction writer, as a visiting professor.

Later this month, LCC is hosting a one-day science fiction symposium that is open to the public (except for the lunch, which is only for symposium participants). If you are in the Atlanta area, I would highly recommend this opportunity to learn about the strong presence of science fiction research at Georgia Tech and to meet some renowned science fiction authors. I have included the overview and schedule below:

Science
 Fiction 
Symposium
 Hosted 
by 
LCC
 Thursday,
 November 
17,
 2011

On Thursday, November 17, the School of Literature, Communication and Culture will host a day-long symposium spotlighting science fiction as a signature intersection of science, technology, and humanistic studies at Georgia Tech. The symposium will feature a series of scholarly panels involving faculty members from various disciplines, showcasing their involvement in science fiction study across various media, as a cultural phenomenon, and as it relates to issues of scientific and technical development. The symposium will also feature a presentation on the Science Fiction Collection at Georgia Tech (recently cited by Science Fiction Studies as one of the twenty most important such collections in the world), a report on student activities in the Science Fiction Research Lab at Tech, and readings by award-winning and critically-acclaimed 
science 
fiction
authors
 Kathleen 
Ann
 Goonan,
 Eugie
 Foster,
 J.M.
 McDermott
, and
 Chesya
 Burke.
 All
 presentations
 will 
be 
in 
Skiles
 rm.
 002. 
The
 Georgia 
Tech
 and
 Atlanta 
communities 
are 
invited 
to 
attend.*

9:30
am‐10:45
am:

 Science 
Fiction 
and
 Society
Jackie 
Royster 
(IAC/LCC), 
Tom 
Morely 
(MATH), 
Aaron 
Santesso 
(LCC,
 moderator), 
Richard 
Barke
(PubP), 
Kristie 
Champlan
 Gurley
(PubP)

10:45
am‐11:00
am:
Coffee
Break

11:00
am‐12:00
pm: 

Science
 Fiction
 Collection
 Presentation 
and
 Student 
Demos
Ryan
 Speer 
(LIB),
 Joshua
 Cuneo
 (LCC),
 Keith
 Johnson (LCC),
 Adam
 LeDoux
 (LCC),
 Paul 
Zaitsev
(LCC),
Lisa
Yaszek
 (LCC,
moderator)

12:00
pm‐1:30
pm:

 Catered 
Lunch
 for 
Symposium
 Participants 
with 
Author 
Reading
Kathy 
Goonan,
This
 Shared 
Dream
 (LCC)

1:30
pm‐2:45
pm:

 Speculative 
Fiction 
in
 Literary
 and
 Cultural 
History
Peter
 Brecke 
(INTA), 
Carol 
Senf 
(LCC,
moderator),
 Nihad
 Farooq
(LCC), 
Narin
 Hassan 
(LCC)

2:45 pm‐3:00 pm: Coffee Break

3:00 pm‐ 4:15 pm: Science Fiction Across Media
Michael Nitsche (LCC), Jay Telotte (LCC, moderator), Lisa Yaszek
(LCC), Nettrice Gaskins (LCC), Hank Whitson (LCC)

4:30 pm‐6:00 pm: Science Fiction in Atlanta: Author Reading and Book Signing
Kathy Goonan (LCC, moderator), J.M. McDermott, Eugie Foster, Chesya
Burke

*Except lunch, which will take place in Skiles 343 and is only for symposium participants.

Spring 2010 AGES Grad Student Symposium, Yufang and I Are Presenting

Come out for the Spring 2010 AGES Graduate Student Symposium on April 22 from 11:00am until 1:00pm in 209 Satterfield Hall. Yufang is presenting her paper, “Cultural Memory and Schizophrenic Identity in Hua-Ling Nieh’s Mulberry and Peach,” and I will present my as-yet-unwritten essay, “James Cameron’s Avatar, Primitivism, and Pastoral Machines.” See you there!

2nd Annual Science Fiction Studies Symposium at UC-Riverside

If you’re in California on May 27, or have some travel funding available, you should go to the 2nd annual Science Fiction Studies Symposium at UC-Riverside. Rob Latham sent out the following details:

The second annual Science Fiction Studies Symposium will be held on May 27, Thursday, at the University of California, Riverside on the topic of “Animal Studies and Science Fiction.” The Symposium will take place from 2:30-5:00 PM in the Reading Room of the Special Collections and Archives Department of Rivera Library, which houses the J. Lloyd Eaton Collection of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, and Utopian Literature. Here is a list of speakers and the titles of their talks:

➢    “Animal Studies in the Era of Biopower”
➢    Sherryl Vint (Brock University)
Sherryl Vint is Associate Professor of English at Brock University in Ontario. She is the author of Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction (2007) and Animal Alterity: Science Fiction and the Question of the Animal (2010) and an editor of the collections The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction (2009), Fifty Key Figures in Science Fiction (2009), and Beyond Cyberpunk: New Critical Perspectives (2010). She co-edits the journals Extrapolation, Science Fiction Film and Television, and Humanimalia.
➢    “Talking (for, with) Dogs: Science Fiction Breaks the Species Barrier”
➢    Joan Gordon (Nassau Community College)
Joan Gordon is Professor of English at Nassau Community College in New York. She is a former president of the Science Fiction Research Association, an editor for Science Fiction Studies  and Humanimalia,  and a co-editor of several collections of scholarly essays including Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture (1997),  Edging Into the Future: Science Fiction and Contemporary Cultural Transformation (2002), and Queer Universes: Sexualities in Science Fiction (2008). She  recently spent a year as a Fulbright Distinguished Chair at Marie Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland, and is at present working on the connections among science fiction, sociobiology, and animal studies, having published related articles for Science Fiction Studies and for the Routledge Companion to Science Fiction.
➢    “The Animal Down-Deep: Cordwainer Smith’s Late Tales of the Underpeople
➢    Carol McGuirk (Florida Atlantic University)
Carol McGuirk is Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University and an editor of Science Fiction Studies. Her column on science fiction in the New York Daily News during the 1980s afforded a close-up view of that decade’s remarkable transformation of the genre. She has written many articles and three books on Robert Burns, including an annotated selection of his poems for Penguin. Her science fiction scholarship has focused on equally mythic yet misunderstood authors, among them Cordwainer Smith. This talk is part of her ongoing project Dominion, which considers literary representations of animals during the three centuries between Milton’s Paradise Lost (1667) and Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968).

A reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public. Please feel free to attend, spread the word, post or distribute the flyer, etc.

The Symposium is co-sponsored by the journal, by the Eaton Collection, and by the English Department Lecture Committee. My thanks to them all.

The proceedings from the first annual event, on the topic “The Histories of Science Fiction,” were recently published in the journal Science Fiction Studies in March 2010.

AGES Spring 2009 Graduate Research Symposium at Kent State

I’m presenting a shortened version of my ICFA 2009 essay, “Time Enough for Twitter:  Postmodern Science Fiction and Online Personas,” at tomorrow’s Graduate Research Symposium at Kent State.  It will take place from noon to 1:30pm on Thursday in Satterfield Hall, Room 209.  I hope that you can make it out!  

Here are more details from Patrick Thomas:

The Association of Graduate English Students (AGES) cordially invites all English faculty and students to the Spring 2009 Graduate Research Symposium on Thursday, April 23rd from 12:00pm–1:30pm in 209 Satterfield Hall.  This year’s Symposium features presentations from five graduate students in the Literature, Rhetoric and Composition, and MFA programs.  Enjoy an afternoon of lively discussion and learn about the interesting work our graduate students are doing!  Light refreshments will be served.  For more information, contact Jillian Hill, AGES President, at jcoates2@kent.edu.