Blog Archives

Video Tour of the City Tech Science Fiction Collection

Over the weekend, I put together a short video highlighting the size and arrangement of the City Tech Science Fiction Collection. Check it out embedded below.

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Posted in City Tech, Science Fiction

Lego Building Experiments with Google Glass, Thoughts on Its Potential for Interdisciplinary Humanities Research

Since I received my Google Glass last week, I have been learning how to wear and use it. Ultimately, I want to incorporate Glass into my Retrocomputing Lab research workflow. I am interested in the experience of using computer hardware

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Posted in Computers, Research, Technology

ENGL1101 Sections G3 and L, Fall 2013, Project 2 Narrative Videos Based on John Medina’s Brain Rules

I revised my “Maximizing the Brain” Project 2 Assignment for my current ENGL1101 students at Georgia Tech. It is currently in its third iteration, and I have ideas for its fourth iteration with more radical changes. In the meantime, my

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Posted in Georgia Tech, Pedagogy

Spring 2013 ENGL1101 Project 2, “Maximizing the Brain’s Potential,” Final Videos

For the second major project in my ENGL1101 class at Georgia Tech titled, “Maximizing the Brain’s Potential,” students work in teams of several students each to produce collaboratively an entertaining and educational video based on a single chapter from John Medina’s

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Posted in Georgia Tech, Pedagogy

Best Source of American Space Missions: NASA Human Space Flight Gallery

If you want the best seat in the house for NASA missions, you should visit the NASA Human Space Flight Gallery. When I’m not reading about the brain and science fiction, I like to fall back on my interest in space

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Posted in Science, Technology

Brian Dunning’s Here Be Dragons: An Introduction to Critical Thinking

A post on Kristin Sanford’s excellent science blog, The Bird’s Brain, directed me to a terrific 40 minute video by Brian Dunning on critical thinking.  Available here, Dunning describes all the basics for critically engaging, evaluating, and questioning the world

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Posted in Science
Who is Dynamic Subspace?

Dr. Jason W. Ellis shares his interdisciplinary research and pedagogy on DynamicSubspace.net. Its focus includes the exploration of science, technology, and cultural issues through science fiction and neuroscientific approaches. It includes vintage computing, LEGO, and other wonderful things, too.

He is an Assistant Professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City Tech) where he teaches college writing, technical communication, and science fiction.

He holds a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University, M.A. in Science Fiction Studies from the University of Liverpool, and B.S. in Science, Technology, and Culture from Georgia Tech.

He welcomes questions, comments, and inquiries for collaboration via email at jellis at citytech dot cuny dot edu or Twitter @dynamicsubspace.

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