New Book Announcement: Carter Kaplan’s Diogenes

Carter Kaplan, who I have mentioned here, here and here, and who is the author of the Michael Moorcock blessed novel Tally Ho, Cornelius!, has a new novel out called Diogenes, which he describes as, “Literary science fiction in the form of Aristophanic comedy.” Another interesting work by a more interesting character!

Announcement: Carol Senf’s ‘Bram Stoker’ Now Available

Carol Senf, my friend and professor at Georgia Tech, recently released a new book in the University of Wales Press Gothic Author: Critical Revision series on Bram Stoker.

Bram Stoker would be a useful book in gothic literature or Stoker focused classes, because Prof. Senf is a very thorough researcher and the paperback edition of Bram Stoker has a very student-friendly price point. Libraries should also add this to this to their collection on one of the most widely read and enduring works of literature.

Bram Stoker is now available through Amazon.com here.

Call for SFRA Publicity Director Applications

I would like to extend an invitation to all SFRA members to apply to serve the organization as its next Publicity Director. As the SFRA Vice-President, I am accepting applications until December 1, 2010. Please read below for the details.

Hi all,

As the SFRA Vice-President, I am now accepting applications for the
organization’s next Publicity Director. The SFRA Publicity Director is
a non-elected position under the supervision of the Vice-President
whose primary objective is the promotion of the organization, its
work, and the accomplishments of its members. Serving as the SFRA
Publicity Director is a personally and professionally rewarding
experience that significantly contributes to the wider recognition of
the SFRA. All members are invited to apply, but I would like to
particularly encourage members who are graduate students and young
scholars to apply for this position.

The Publicity Director’s duties will include: organization and
membership promotion in old and new media; post announcements and
organizational news to sfra.org, Facebook, Twitter, and the SFRA
listserv; pitch, write, and distribute reports of the annual meeting
to science fiction blogs and publications; timely availability by
email; approximately two hours per week commitment (immediately before
and after the annual meeting requires more time); working with the Web
Director; and taking direction from the Vice-President.

Applicants should send an email to me at dynamicsubspace at gmail dot com. In
your email, please introduce yourself, describe how you would approach
the publicity director role, elaborate on your ideas for promoting the
organization, indicate any prior promotional work and writing that you
have done, and include links to your online writing if you blog.

I am accepting applications from interested members until December 1,
2010. Please contact me if you have any questions regarding the
Publicity Director position.

Best, Jason

Apple’s “Back to the Mac” Event on October 20, 2010

According to TUAW and many others, Apple is holding a special “Back to the Mac” event next Wednesday, October 20. As you can see in the image above that I captured from TUAW, the image of a lion is mapped to the inner surface of the 3D Apple logo, so this could mean that the next iteration of Mac OS X will be code named Lion. Also, I am wondering about the beveled corners on the image. I browsed the same image on several non-referring announcements online for the event and they all have the bevel. Could Apple be reintroducing beveled corners to the Mac OS X menu bar? Square corners has always felt too PC to me.

New Journal Announcement: Sikh Studies: Cultural Perspectives

Masood Raja, late of Kent State and now at the University of North Texas, recently announced a newly launched journal called Sikh Studies: Cultural Perspectives. He is going to serve as the managing editor for the journal, which is being founded by Professor (emeritus) Harbans Lal. They now have an official website up-and-running here (with a title banner I built in Adobe Photoshop CS4), and I imagine it won’t take the journal long to get running at full speed with Professor Raja’s experience launching Pakistaniaat: A Journal of Pakistan Studies nearly two years ago. If you want to join the new Sikh Studies journal on the ground floor, I would highly recommend you contact Professor Raja at mraja@unt.edu as soon as possible.

Representative New Science Fiction Collection, The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction

Rob Latham sent the following announcement and table of contents to the SFRA email list for The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. It looks like an amazing lineup of stories, and I can’t wait to see the final product when it is released late Summer 2010.

The editors of Science Fiction Studies are pleased and proud to announce the imminent publication of a project we have been working on for some years. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction is designed to provide a historical survey of the genre and includes 52 works ranging from Hawthorne’s “Rappaccini’s Daughter,” published in 1844, to Ted Chiang’s “Exhalation”(2008). The chronological table of contents follows; the anthology will also include a thematic table of contents that divides the stories into nine themes: Alien Encounters, Apocalypse and Post-Apocalypse, Artificial/Posthuman Lifeforms, Computers and Virtual Reality, Evolution and Environment, Gender and Sexuality, Time Travel and Alternate History, Utopias/Dystopias, and War and Conflict. An introduction offers historical and theoretical guidance to readers of sf, and individual headnotes for each text provide an overview of each author’s life and characteristic concerns as a writer, as well as historical/contextual information.

While we believe that the Wesleyan Anthology of SF will supply an abundance of reading pleasure for anyone interested in the genre, the work is geared for classroom use as well. Concurrent with the book’s publication, we will be launching a website to provide supplementary materials, including study questions for each story, possible topics for essays and exams, sample syllabi based on the anthology’s contents, and links to other online resources. Wesleyan has announced the book for August 2010, so we believe that it will be available for use in classes beginning in the Fall. If you are scheduled to teach a course in sf during the coming year, we hope that you will consider adopting the book; the paperback edition will be priced at $39.95.

Table of Contents

Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Rappaccini’s Daughter” (1844)

Jules Verne, excerpt from Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864)

H. G. Wells, “The Star” (1897)

E. M. Forster, “The Machine Stops” (1909)

Edmond Hamilton, “The Man Who Evolved” (1931)

Leslie F. Stone, “The Conquest of Gola” (1931)

C. L. Moore, “Shambleau” (1933)

Stanley Weinbaum, “A Martian Odyssey” (1934)

Isaac Asimov, “Reason” (1941)

Clifford Simak, “Desertion” (1944)

Theodore Sturgeon, “Thunder and Roses” (1947)

Judith Merril, “That Only a Mother” (1948)

Fritz Leiber, “Coming Attraction” (1950)

Ray Bradbury, “There Will Come Soft Rains” (1950)

Arthur C. Clarke, “The Sentinel” (1951)

Robert Sheckley, “Specialist” (1953)

William Tenn, “The Liberation of Earth” (1953)

Alfred Bester, “Fondly Fahrenheit” (1954)

Avram Davidson, “The Golem” (1955)

Cordwainer Smith, “The Game of Rat and Dragon” (1955)

Robert Heinlein, “All You Zombies—” (1959)

J.G. Ballard, “The Cage of Sand” (1962)

R. A. Lafferty, “Slow Tuesday Night” (1965)

Harlan Ellison, “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” (1965)

Frederik Pohl, “Day Million” (1966)

Philip K. Dick, “We Can Remember It For You Wholesale” (1966)

Samuel R. Delany, “Aye, and Gomorrah…” (1967)

Pamela Zoline, “The Heat Death of the Universe” (1967)

Robert Silverberg, “Passengers” (1968)

Brian Aldiss, “Supertoys Last All Summer Long” (1969)

Ursula K. Le Guin, “Nine Lives” (1969)

Frank Herbert, “Seed Stock” (1970)

Stanislaw Lem, “The Seventh Voyage” from The Star Diaries (1971)

Joanna Russ, “When It Changed” (1972)

James Tiptree, Jr., “And I Awoke and Found Me Here On the Cold Hill’s Side” (1973)

John Varley, “Air Raid” (1977)

Carol Emshwiller, “Abominable” (1980)

William Gibson, “Burning Chrome” (1981)

Octavia Butler, “Speech Sounds” (1983)

Nancy Kress, “Out of All Them Bright Stars” (1985)

Pat Cadigan, “Pretty Boy Crossover” (1986)

Kate Wilhelm, “Forever Yours, Anna” (1987)

Bruce Sterling, “We See Things Differently” (1989)

Misha Nogha, “Chippoke Na Gomi” (1989)

Eileen Gunn, “Computer Friendly” (1989)

John Kessel, “Invaders” (1990)

Gene Wolfe, “Useful Phrases” (1992)

Greg Egan, “Closer” (1992)

James Patrick Kelly, “Think Like a Dinosaur” (1995)

Geoff Ryman, “Everywhere” (1999)

Charles Stross, “Rogue Farm” (2003)

Ted Chiang, “Exhalation” (2008)

SFRA 2009 in Atlanta Announcement

Lisa Yaszek and Doug Davis have announced the 2009 Science Fiction Research Association 40th annual conference in Atlanta, Georgia.  I’ll be there–will you?

See below for the details!

SFRA 2009: Engineering the Future and Southern-Fried Science Fiction and Fantasy
June 11-14, Atlanta, GA (Wyndham Midtown Hotel)
Guest of Honor: Michael Bishop
Special Guest Authors: F. Brett Cox, Paul di Filippo, Andy Duncan, Kathleen Ann Goonan, and Jack McDevitt
Hosted by: Lisa Yaszek and Doug Davis

SFRA is currently accepting individual abstracts and panel proposal for its 2009 conference. We welcome paper and panel submissions that explore any aspect of science fiction across history and media and are particularly interested in those that engage one or both of the conference themes, “Engineering the Future” and “Southern-Fried Science Fiction and Fantasy,” or the work of one or more of the conference’s guest authors.

The 2009 conference’s two themes and its selection of guest authors are inspired by the conference’s location in Atlanta and its co-sponsorship by Georgia Tech’s School of Literature, Communication, and Culture. Atlanta, a storied locale in American history, is also in many ways an international city of the future, home to 21st century information, entertainment, technological and military industries, peopled with 21st century demographics, and prone to 21st century situations.

How is the future engineered in science fiction and how has science fiction already engineered our present? The American south has long been well known for its gothic fiction, but it has increasingly figured in works of science fiction and fantasy too. So it is equally fitting to ask, how has the south been an inspiration of science fiction and fantasy and what will its global future in speculative arts and letters be?

The deadline for proposals is April 1, 2009 at midnight EST. Please submit paper and panel proposals by email to sfra2009@gmail.com . Include all text of the proposal in the body of the email (not as an attachment). Please be sure to include full contact information for all panel members and to make all AV requests within each proposal.

For more information, email sfra2009@gmail.com. And as of September 1, 2008, be sure to check out http://www.sfra2009.com for more details!