Current Research in Speculative Fiction, Liverpool, England, June 18, 2011

Earlier this year, I mentioned the call for papers for the Current Research in Speculative Fiction Postgraduate Conference at the University of Liverpool on June 18, 2011. They have settled on their program after having an enormous response from the speculative fiction community. They are no longer accepting papers, but you should consider attending if you will be in the neighborhood in June. If I could, I would certainly be there!

Details from the official CRSF Facebook Group:

Current Research in Speculative Fiction(CRSF) 2011:
“A Vampire, a Troll, and a Martian Walk Into a Bar…”
18th June 2011
Keynote Lectures from: Professor Adam Roberts (Royal Holloway, University of London), Mr Andy Sawyer (Science Fiction Foundation Collection Librarian; Director of MA in Science Fiction Studies, University of Liverpool)

————————————————————–

We apologise but we can no longer accept any further papers for this conferences.

However, we still welcome delegates from all scopes of speculative fiction.
The conference carries a fee of £25 until April 30th 2011, after which time it will rise to £30, this fee includes refreshments and lunch. To pay this fee please go to https://payments.liv.ac.uk/ and follow the links for Conferences and Events. Many thanks.

For further information, email the conference team at CRSF2011@gmail.com

CFP: Current Research in Speculative Fiction Conference, June 2011, University of Liverpool

Glyn Morgan forwarded me the following cfp for the Current Research in Speculative Fiction Conference at the University of Liverpool on June 18, 2011. Adam Roberts and Andy Sawyer are the prestigious keynote lecturers. There are exciting things going on at the University of Liverpool regarding the study of science fiction and fantasy, and you should be a part of them. Liverpool is home to the huge science fiction special collection, the MA in Science Fiction Studies, and now a conference. Go here to read the cfp on Glyn’s blog, or read it below:

CRSF 2011 – Call For Papers

“A Vampire, a Troll, and a Martian Walk Into a Bar….”
– Call for Papers –
18th June 2011
University of Liverpool
Keynote Lectures from: Professor Adam Roberts (Royal Holloway, University of London), Mr Andy Sawyer (Science Fiction Foundation Collection Librarian; Director of MA in Science Fiction Studies, University of Liverpool)
———————————————————-
CRSF is a postgraduate conference designed to promote the research of speculative fictions including, but not limited to, science fiction, fantasy and horror.
Our aim is to showcase some of the latest developments in this dynamic and evolving field, by providing a platform for the presentation of current research by postgraduates. The conference will also encourage the discussion of this research and the construction of crucial networks with fellow researchers. The University of Liverpool is a leading centre for the study of speculative fiction, being home to the Science Fiction Foundation Collection, and is thus ideally suited to such a cause.
This year we would like to focus on encouraging postgraduates to network with others in their field, and related areas, whilst also demonstrating the depth and breadth of research currently being conducted into speculative fiction. As such we welcome 300 word abstracts on topics as diverse as, but not limited to:
•Alternate History •Apocalypse •Environmental Philosophy •Gaming •Genre Evolution •Genre Language and the Language of Genre •Gender and Sexuality •Graphic Novels •Representations of Psychology and Consciousness •Speculative Fiction across Media – Adaptation, Translation and Franchise •Speculative Spaces, Places and Races •The Supernatural and the Other •Technology and Magic •”Why Has No One Thought of This Before?” •Young Adult Fiction.
Abstracts of 300 words, for papers intended to run for twenty minutes,  should be submitted to CRSF2011@gmail.com by 01/04/11.
For further information, email the conference team at CRSF2011@gmail.com
Note: although we are looking for papers from postgraduates we welcome delegates from across the spectrum of academic and speculative fiction fields. This conference is the first of a planned annual series and cannot succeed without you support so please pass this along to everyone who might be interested.

 

Nostalgic for Liverpool: Watching The Priests at Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral

I’m watching The Priests, a classical vocal group of three Irish priests: Fr Eugene O’Hagan, Fr Martin O’Hagan, and Fr David Delargy, perform at the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral on PBS. When I studied for my MA in Liverpool, my friend Jean and I would run around Metropolitan Cathedral (what we fondly called ‘spaceship cathedral’) on our daily morning jog. The Priests have beautiful voices, and it would have been a treat to hear them sing in person.

Scanning, Recycling, and Reflecting

Yufang and I purchased a Canon CanoScan LIDE 100 flatbed scanner, because we wanted to cut down on all of our cooperatively accumulated clutter of papers, notes, and other school-related documents.  The past few days have been an interesting experience for me as I worked through notes from Georgia Tech, the University of Liverpool, and the past two years at Kent State.  

First, I am amazed at how much my handwriting has transformed over the years, and even from semester to semester.  In fact, if I did not know that I wrote all of this stuff, there is no way in Hades that I would believe the same person wrote all of these notes.  

Second, it is interesting how my note taking hasn’t changed that much over the years.  Anyone who has taken a class with me knows that I write down everything that I possibly can during class.  As a result, I have volumes of handwritten notes for all of my classes.  However, there are some subtle changes with the way that I cluster information on the page.  For example, my earlier notes are essentially one thought per line, but my later notes contain chunks of information with the first line against the margin and subsequent, related thoughts are listed beneath the first line with a hanging indent.  I’m not sure why I began doing this, but it seems to be a more recent development in grad school.  

Third, I’m surprised at how many notes are missing.  I know that I tossed a lot of material when I left Liverpool, but I’m missing a considerable amount of material from Kent State.  I have moved a couple of times since beginning school here, so it is possible that I accidentally threw some things out that I didn’t want to, or a box of school-related material may have been lost or left behind.  This is of course unfortunate, but there isn’t anything that I can do about it now.

Currently, Babacar’s African-American Literature class has 110 pages, Pendleton’s Semeiotics class is second with 100 pages, and Raja’s Postcolonialism course comes in second at 88 pages.

Another project that I’m working on right now is scanning all of my Star Wars and Star Trek clippings.  I’ve accumulated a small collection of magazine and calendar images of spacecraft that I’m currently assembling into a digital archive.

And, I have a deal for my KSU friends–I will trade you my class notes in exchange for yours.  After I finish scanning all of my class materials, I will let you borrow the scanner to digitize your own notes.  Let me know if you’re interested.