Happy Christmas to All!

George Lucas attempted to show audiences that his character Darth Vader was not as evil as he may have appeared in the original Star Wars trilogy of movies. Instead, Vader was motivated by a tremendous fear of loss. Certainly, Padme Amidala replacing his mother, first by separation and later by her death, created an unhealthy attachment on the part of young Anakin Skywalker towards the child queen. One could assuredly write a psychoanalytic analysis on this trauma. However, the reason that I bring this is up is that Anakin’s/Darth Vader’s fear of loss derives from his love, perhaps obsessively adolescent love, for Padme. I believe that Anakin’s/Darth Vader’s love for Padme demonstrates that even the cyborg Vader maintained enough human affection that he could return as Anakin with the greatest gift: self-sacrifice.

Y and I wish everyone a very happy Christmas!

I am a professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY whose teaching includes composition and technical communication, and research focuses on 20th/21st-century American culture, science fiction, neuroscience, and digital technology.

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Posted in Personal, Science Fiction
2 comments on “Happy Christmas to All!
  1. Smitha says:

    It’s a really great construct, in theory–I caught the last 30 minutes of Revenge of the Sith on Spike this evening, and they did a really great job with parallels (both between the death of Padme and the “death” of Anakin/birth of Vader, and the prequels and the OT), the former of which I hadn’t paid close attention to before. Isolating just the final section (plus, not having watched it in quite a while) did help, and going back and thinking critically about Anakin’s attachments and relationships throughout the movies would be really telling.

    I think there are a lot of really great themes like that in the prequel trilogy, but you really have to dig for some of them because the presentation is so bad that they’re unfortunately obscured. (It really ruined a lot of cool ideas, like the purpose of General Grievous (and his hacking cough in particular), as a prototype/predecessor of the same biotechnology that ended up fueling Anakin/Vader’s prosthetics.) However, the prequels have forever changed my perception of Anakin/Vader, and I do appreciate the extra depth.

    Happy holidays, guys. :) Hope you’re staying warm and doing well!

  2. Jason Ellis says:

    Greetings from Taiwan, Smitha! Thanks for your comment on Revenge of the Sith and the well wishes. We flew through Narita airport last night, but our layover was too short to have a chance to look around. I do hope that we have a chance in the future to explore Japan more. Now, we are safely at home at Y’s parents’ house outside of Taipei. We’ve only been here one night and now half a day, but I have already had some of the best tofu, fish, and shrimp in my entire life! Y’s parents are great, and I’m looking forward to the rest of our trip. Talk to you again soon, and have a great holiday yourself! -Jason

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Who is Dynamic Subspace?

Dr. Jason W. Ellis shares his interdisciplinary research and pedagogy on DynamicSubspace.net. Its focus includes the exploration of science, technology, and cultural issues through science fiction and neuroscientific approaches. It includes vintage computing, LEGO, and other wonderful things, too.

He is an Assistant Professor of English at the New York City College of Technology, CUNY (City Tech) where he teaches college writing, technical communication, and science fiction.

He holds a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University, M.A. in Science Fiction Studies from the University of Liverpool, and B.S. in Science, Technology, and Culture from Georgia Tech.

He welcomes questions, comments, and inquiries for collaboration via email at jellis at citytech dot cuny dot edu or Twitter @dynamicsubspace.

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